Int 14 project

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chris
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Int 14 project

Post by chris » Sat Nov 30, 2013 11:20 am

OK. here are some of the nasty bits of Blue Peter the International 14 that is now in the workshop.
I've been temporarily refitting the parts back into the hull and making a mould to support the transom end which has some nasty problems of its own but I am just trying to get the shape back first and seeing what it should be. The hull has been without the rest of the structure for many years so getting the shape back is the first task before I start anything else.
This is what the stem and bow currently look like:
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stem sm.jpg
bow sm.jpg

rme_01
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by rme_01 » Sat Nov 30, 2013 10:44 pm

good grief you have got your work cut out!

anyhow going back to your query re rock elm, I have been wondering about substitutes should I need to make repairs for my Uffa 14 (K380) and have rather come to the conclusion that good straight grained Ash would be the best (readily available) bet. Density, strength and MOE are a little lower but not wildly different from Rock Elm, shock resistance is good and crucially it bends well on steaming.

Any thoughts?

chris
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by chris » Sat Nov 30, 2013 11:09 pm

The downside to ash would be that its not very rot resistant in marine use .. I think oak would be better.
I'm following up several leads but The more I look these ribs are actually not broken only 2/4 essential to replace.

kfz
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by kfz » Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:33 pm

No not Ash......

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PeterV
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by PeterV » Mon Dec 02, 2013 10:49 pm

I know that Ash is not recommended for marine use but it is used for dinghy tillers. The tiller I made for my Finn has only a couple of coats of varnish on it and still looks like new, 6 years after making it. So, I wonder if ash is fine for a dinghy which spends the majority of its time out of the water.
PeterV
Finn K197 & GBR564
Warsash

chris
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by chris » Tue Dec 03, 2013 10:10 am

I would certainly agree that ash is a very good as well as a common timber for tillers, I have ash tillers too. It does have all the right characteristics - non splitting, resistance to shock, bending etc. However a rib is likely to get wet/dry/wet/dry much more than a tiller (unless its a tiller on a moth!) and I would suggest that even a dinghy rib won't last that long if it is ash. It is not possible to varnish the bits that are adjacent to the planking or hog so water will get in quite easily in places on the rib.

Bill-Conner
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by Bill-Conner » Tue Dec 03, 2013 10:58 am

Don't you varnish the rib and the plank before fitting then?
Anyway I agree Canadian Rock Elm is the best thing, you can tie knots in it.

kfz
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by kfz » Tue Dec 03, 2013 1:24 pm

PeterV wrote:I know that Ash is not recommended for marine use but it is used for dinghy tillers. The tiller I made for my Finn has only a couple of coats of varnish on it and still looks like new, 6 years after making it. So, I wonder if ash is fine for a dinghy which spends the majority of its time out of the water.


The last piece of ash I bought was for this reason, for a tiller. The lad in the yard got real upset when I said it was for a boat, Not suitable he said! Nearly didnt sell it to me.....

Kev

Obscured by clouds
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by Obscured by clouds » Tue Dec 03, 2013 3:52 pm

well we'll see. The outer rubbing strake, as well as the cockpit coaming on the Sibrwd project is all in ash. :lol:

It has been well sealed with CPES [Eposeal] and will be varnished, or maybe even Varnol'ed.
Tony



MR 2404 Julia Dream
N18 276 Sibrwd [ongoing project]
Hirondelle catamaran Kalipse
[down to 3!]

rme_01
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by rme_01 » Tue Dec 03, 2013 7:37 pm

By coincidence I was looking through an article in this months Classic Boat on the restoration of a 34ft w Fife cruiser built in 1957. The original intermediate ribs were ash with any rot was taken back to sound timber and new ash ribs scarfed in. This was after 55 years in a wet bilge - by contrast I wouldn't have thought ash ribs in a dry sailed dinghy should be a problem where rock elm is unobtainable and would be a lot easier to work with than oak

Michael Brigg
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by Michael Brigg » Tue Dec 03, 2013 9:38 pm

There is a lot of interesting stuff about different woods and particularly "sustainable wood sourcing" on this website here.

http://www.covboat.co.uk/sustainability.htm

The interesting comment on Ash is that 1.) Modern treatments might well resolve a good deal of the Rot problem.

and 2.) Ash rots worse in fresh water but is reasonably durable in sea water.

That would suggest to me that if you get some ash and really douse it in Clear Cuprinol or Ronseal wood preservative or similar, it should really do OK especially in a dry sailed boat with relatively light (I presume) usage. These wood preservative are really nothing more than rot inhibiting salts in a penetrating solvent vehicle that evapourates away

(I have found that Clear Cuprinol dries out nicely without altering the appearance of the wood and then will take a coat of varnish without reacting.)
Michael Brigg

Keith66
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by Keith66 » Tue Dec 10, 2013 7:42 pm

I cant see how you will find any rock elm, as its been unobtainable for years. You may be lucky & find the odd small supplyfrom someone who has hoarded some! I wouldnt use ash as its durability is awful. There is an alternative timber in Black locust, otherwise known as false acacia, it is reckoned to be excelent for steaming & is extremely strong, durability is superb.
It is often planted in the UK as an ornamental tree but often overlooked for timber use. Worth using if you can find some.

Stephen Hawkins
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by Stephen Hawkins » Wed Dec 11, 2013 2:34 pm

All I can say is:

Good luck Chris.

Cheers
Steve Hawkins

1967 National 12 2383 "Sparkle"

chris
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by chris » Fri Dec 27, 2013 12:23 pm

Well the back 3" is done!
Tongue and groove planking made (1"x3/16") and then splicing lots of new pieces to the old, splices hidden under the new ribs.
The Transom is back in and a new knee too.
now to deal with the bow next..
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Hotspur
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Re: Int 14 project

Post by Hotspur » Thu Jan 02, 2014 11:07 am

Fascinated to see the work on this boat as I went to look at it before (wisely I think) deciding that I lacked the skills and time to do the boat justice. Wonderful to see it coming along. I do love these pre-war 14s
Visit my blog Naval Air History at navalairhistory.com

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